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Making Waves

The AR-15

By Dave Carr

When I was in the army all those years ago, I carried an M-16 rifle.   And I'm amazed   my old M-16 is still around today, better than ever.   It has a different name, though.   Today, it's an AR-15, and it's the gun, and the .223 calibre is the bullet that killed 17 and wounded 14 more last week in Parkland, Florida.  A 19 year old allegedly needed just one rifle and a bunch of 30-round clips to create that carnage.   So let me tell you about that .223 calibre round.   Nominally, it's only larger than the old .22 rim-fire that's been around forever by the thickness of a single human hair.  But this bullet sits atop a much larger shell with a bigger bang and leaves the barrel of an AR-15 at an incredibly high speed.  When it hits a high school student, the entry wound is pretty much the same size as getting shot with a .22, and lots of farm kids have survived that.   But with its rate of speed and instability, once it enters a Grade 10 body, the bullet starts to both tumble and disintegrate.  Its speed guarantees it will go through, but while the entry wound might be small and pristine, a neat little hole like you see on TV, the exit wound might be the size of an American cigarette package.  Now switch that information onto the tiny Grade 1 and 2's of Sandy Hook in 2012.  In both cases, and I suspect all those in between, there' have been a lot of closed coffins out of horrific cosmetic necessity.    The AR-15 is made by Colt for one purpose  --  to kill human beings:  not for hunting, or skeet, or target practice.  It kills humans, period.   I could make the next logical conclusion here, but hey  --  apparently "now is not the time".   So I'm left with thoughts and prayers, and memories of my old M-16 and what it does.  


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